Not a Chance: The Myth of Chance in Modern Science and Cosmology

Not a Chance: The Myth of Chance in Modern Science and Cosmology

Author: Sproul, R. C.
€6.95
Announcing the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, the news reporter began: "Fifteen to 17 billion years ago the universe exploded into being." "Exploded into being?" mused R. C. Sproul. "Does this mean that 15 billion years ago the universe exploded from non-being into being? Then what exploded?" In Not a Chance Sproul takes a hard look at such conundrums: Just what is chance? Can it account for what is? As a respected Christian apologist, theologian, and philosopher, R. C. Sproul might be expected to find causation through chance a hard pill to swallow. But in Not a Chance we learn that he is not alone. Among others troubled by chance probability ... David Hume: "Chance is only our ignorance of real causes"; Charles Darwin: "I cannot look at the universe as a result of blind chance."; Albert Einstein: "Quantum physics is certainly imposing, but an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing ... I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing at dice." In a lively dialog with modern thinkers from Hume to Niels Bohr and Carl Sagan, Not a Chance consults laws of logic, linguistic and scientific theory, and mathematical understandings to probe the cause-effect relationship. Not a Chance invites all students of life to approach, with eyes open and mind alert, the wobbly pedestal from which chance rules modern cosmology.
Book Title Not a Chance: The Myth of Chance in Modern Science and Cosmology
Author Sproul, R. C.
Announcing the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, the news reporter began: "Fifteen to 17 billion years ago the universe exploded into being." "Exploded into being?" mused R. C. Sproul. "Does this mean that 15 billion years ago the universe exploded from non-being into being? Then what exploded?" In Not a Chance Sproul takes a hard look at such conundrums: Just what is chance? Can it account for what is? As a respected Christian apologist, theologian, and philosopher, R. C. Sproul might be expected to find causation through chance a hard pill to swallow. But in Not a Chance we learn that he is not alone. Among others troubled by chance probability ... David Hume: "Chance is only our ignorance of real causes"; Charles Darwin: "I cannot look at the universe as a result of blind chance."; Albert Einstein: "Quantum physics is certainly imposing, but an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing ... I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing at dice." In a lively dialog with modern thinkers from Hume to Niels Bohr and Carl Sagan, Not a Chance consults laws of logic, linguistic and scientific theory, and mathematical understandings to probe the cause-effect relationship. Not a Chance invites all students of life to approach, with eyes open and mind alert, the wobbly pedestal from which chance rules modern cosmology.